HOW CAN WE HELP YOU?
For many of our clients, the American Dream means working and/or raising a family in the United States. We help our clients obtain visas, Green Cards, and citizenship. In addition, we work with investors to develop new businesses in the United States, and obtain visas/Green Cards for themselves and their staff through investment and employment.

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY

 

Individuals and Family

B-1: Temporary Business Visitor Visa


For foreign workers participating in commercial or professional business activities in the US (i.e. consulting, conference attendance, negotiating a contract, or short-term training). Maximum stay: 6 months, with 6-month renewal. Cannot earn an income on this visa. No cap. No deadline. Learn more




B-2: Temporary Pleasure, Tourism or Medical Treatment Visitor Visa


Available to visitors interested in recreational or personal travel. Reasons for a personal visit may include tourism, visiting family and friends, medical treatment, social or service activities, and amateur participants in sporting or entertainment events. Visitors may stay in the US for 6 months, with an opportunity to extend their visit for another 6 months (1 year total). Learn more




F-1: Student Visa


​- Optional Practical Training (OPT) is temporary employment that is directly related to an F-1 student’s major area of study. Eligible students can apply to receive up to 12 months of OPT employment authorization before completing their academic studies (pre-completion) and/or after completing their academic studies (post-completion). However, all periods of pre-completion OPT will be deducted from the available period of post-completion OPT. Curricular Practical Training (CPT): Students are not required to immediately return home upon completion of their program on an F1 visa. Instead, F-1 visa holders can remain in the US for up to 60 days after completing their academic program or OPT training. Any students wishing to remain in the States after their program must change their visa status, re-enroll in a higher program, or have the option to transfer to a new school and receive new visa documents.




Green Card Based on Marriage


I-485 - Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status

  • Once a foreign spouse has received an approved I-130 (or if the spouse is already in the US), the foreign national can apply to Adjust Status to that of a Legal Permanent Resident (Green Card application).
  • For purposes of a marriage-based Green Card, only a foreign spouse who is physically present in the United States can file an I-485 to apply for a Green Card. The processing time for I-485 applications filed by spouses of U.S. citizens is currently about 9-12 months.
  • The foreign national will also apply for work authorization (EAD card) and Advance Parole to have permission to leave the United States while the Adjustment of Status application is pending without abandoning the application.
I-130 - Petition for Alien Relative
  • Use this form if you are a citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States who wants to petition for your spouse to immigrate to the United States with a Green Card.
  • For married couples that are both present in the United States, you will file the I-130 at the same time as the I-485 to Adjust Status to that of a Legal Permanent Resident (Green Card application). Spouses who reside outside the United States may apply for a visa with the U.S. consulate in their home country through the I-130.
Form I-485 - Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status
  • Typically, relatives who reside outside the United States may apply for a visa with the U.S. Department of State. For more information, please see the form instructions.




German Citizenship Retention


Under the German Nationality Act “Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetz”, the moment a German citizen acquires citizenship of another country, he or she loses German citizenship automatically because German law does not allow dual citizenship in this context. This means that if a US resident wishes to obtain US citizenship while retaining his or her German citizenship, the applicant must first petition the German government to allow the applicant to maintain his or her German citizenship. This requirement is unique to German citizens and provides an additional, preliminary step before the applicant may apply for US citizenship. Learn more




Citizenship/Naturalization


If you meet certain requirements, you may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth. To become a citizen at birth, you must:

  • Have been born in the United States or certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; OR
  • Had a parent or parents who were citizens at the time of your birth (if you were born abroad) and meet other requirements

To become a citizen after birth, you must:

  • Apply for “derived” or “acquired” citizenship through parents

  • Apply for naturalization

    • You May Qualify for Naturalization if:

      • You have been a permanent resident for at least 5 years and meet all other eligibility requirements, please visit our Path to Citizenship page for more information.

      • You have been a permanent resident for 3 years or more and meet all eligibility requirements to file as a spouse of a U.S. citizen, please visit our Naturalization for Spouses of U.S. Citizens page for more information.

      • You have qualifying service in the U.S. armed forces and meet all other eligibility requirements. Visit the Military section of our website.

      • Your child may qualify for naturalization if you are a U.S. citizen, the child was born outside the U.S., the child is currently residing outside the U.S., and all other eligibility requirements are met.




K-1: Fiance Visa


A K-1 visa is issued to the fiancé or fiancée of a United States citizen to enter the United States with the intent to marry. The K-1 visa requires that the foreigner marry his or her U.S. citizen petitioner within 90 days of entry, or else he or she must depart the United States. After marriage, the US citizen spouse can petition to Adjust Status to that of a Permanent Resident (apply for a Green Card)





We help family members reunite and stay together based on fiancée, spouse, sibling, or parent/child relationships.

 
 

EMPLOYEE OR EMPLOYER

We help talented individuals and professionals work in the United States for a sponsoring employer, and prepare Green Card applications when applicable. Explore options for either an immigrant or non-immigrant employee.

Employment-Based Immigrant Visas

Employment-Based Non-Immigrant Visas

IMMIGRANT VISAS

 

An “Immigrant Visa petition” is an application to obtain Permanent Residency or “Green Card.” The petition may be filed by (1) an employer, (2) the Applicant himself or herself, or (3) by a family member. “Family members” can be: (1) a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident spouse, (2) a U.S. citizen child over the age of 21, or (3) a U.S. Citizen parent. In some instances, such as the EB-1, a foreign national can “self-petition” on his or her own behalf if she or she can

demonstrate an exceptional ability in his or her profession.


An immigrant petition (Form I-140) must first be approved by USCIS before the applicant can take the next step to Adjust Status to that of a Permanent Resident with Form I-485. Once the I-140 application is approved, applicants residing outside of the United States must attend an interview abroad at a U.S. consulate or embassy. If the visa is approved, it will be
placed in the passport and returned to the Beneficiary within a week. The immigrant visa is not in itself proof of Permanent Residence, but is merely the documentation necessary to enter the U.S. as a Permanent Resident. Once the Beneficiary is inspected by an immigration officer at a U.S. port of entry, the Beneficiary receives a stamp on the visa, and mandatory departure date on an I-94 form. Once the Beneficiary has been admitted to the U.S., the Beneficiary will receive a
Green Card.


Applicants residing within the United States may submit a form I-485 to USCIS to Adjust their Status to that of Permanent Resident. In this case, they will not actually obtain an immigrant visa, but rather will be granted immigrant status (Permanent Residence), as evidenced by a Green Card. 


Green Cards are valid for a period of 10 years. Once a Beneficiary has been a Permanent Resident for 5 years, he or she can apply for Naturalization to become a U.S. Citizen. If the Green Card was obtained based on marriage to a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident, the Beneficiary need only wait 3 years before applying for Naturalization.

Frequently asked questions

Green Cards


are valid for a period of 10 years. Once a Beneficiary has been a Permanent Resident for 5 years, he or she can apply for Naturalization to become a U.S. Citizen. If the Green Card was obtained based on marriage to a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident, the Beneficiary need only wait 3 years before applying for Naturalization.




EB-2: Professionals with Advanced Degrees or Persons with Exceptional Ability


The EB-2 employment-based permanent resident classification is reserved for individuals who fall into one of three categories:

  1. Advanced Degree,
  2. Exceptional Ability,
  3. and National Interest Waiver.
Advanced Degree For the Advanced Degree category, the foreign national must possess a Master’s or higher degree (or its equivalent) in a specific profession and be employed in a position that would require such a degree. Generally, holders of employment-based (H-1B, O-1) or student visa (F-1) classifications will apply for this classification. Exceptional Ability The Exceptional Ability Category requires the foreign national to demonstrate that he or she has gained national or international recognition for past work in the arts, science, or business. The Applicant must also demonstrate that he or she will be employed in a position that requires his or her specific exceptional ability. Often, O-1 outstanding ability nonimmigrant classification holders will apply for this category, given the similarities of the two classifications. National Interest Waiver The National Interest Waiver category is substantially similar to the Exceptional Ability category described above. The one difference is that the foreign national, can request a waiver of the U.S. employer requirement by demonstrating that he or she will bring skills or talent that is highly beneficial to the U.S. Often, O-1 outstanding ability nonimmigrant classification holders will apply for this category based on the similarities of the two classifications, and because an employer is not required.




EB-3: Bachelor's Degree, Skilled, Unskilled Workers


  • While the EB-3 classification covers a variety of professional and unskilled categories, the primary category is the “professionals” category. This is reserved for individuals who possess at least a Bachelor’s Degree (or its equivalent) in a specific profession, and will be working in a position that requires such a degree.
  • While any nonimmigrant classification can be adjusted to this classification, the vast majority of nonimmigrant classification holders who apply for the EB-3 classification hold H-1B Specialty Occupation classifications. This is primarily due to the fact that both the H-1B and the EB-3 classifications have similar underlying requirements.
  • Applicants without a Bachelor’s Degree, such as those on the H-2B for Temporary Non-Agricultural Workers, may apply for the EB-3 unskilled category.




EB-1: Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Researchers/Professors, International Managers/Executive


is an employment-based Permanent Resident classification is reserved for individuals who fall into one of three categories:

  1. Extraordinary Ability
  2. Outstanding Professor or Researcher
  3. Multinational Manager or Executive.
The corresponding nonimmigrant classification that can lead to EB-1 Permanent Residence depends on the specific EB-1 category sought by the Applicant. However, none of these categories requires a nonimmigrant classification as a prerequisite because they can all be obtained by a qualifying foreign national outside the U.S. via consular processing. Extraordinary Ability: This is a self-petitioning category that does not require a prior nonimmigrant visa, but the most typical visas issued as a precursor to the EB-1 are the O-1A and O-1B visas for individuals with extraordinary ability. However, some nonimmigrant classifications do not permit Adjustment of Status in the US, including the Visa Waiver Program, K-1 fiancée classification, and J-1 visas that have a 2-year home country requirement. Outstanding Professor or Researcher: This is a category created specifically for leading academics. While most nonimmigrant classifications can be adjusted to this immigrant category, the most common types are academic or employment-based classifications, such as an F-1 student, H-1B “Specialty Occupation,” or O-1 Outstanding Ability visa. Multinational Executive or Manager: While most nonimmigrant classifications could be adjusted to this category, this is the one category under the EB-1 classification that has a specific corresponding non-immigrant classification--the L-1A Multinational Executive/Manager classification. In order to qualify for the EB-1-3, the applicant must demonstrate executive or managerial employment abroad with a qualifying entity for at least one year in the past three years.





NONIMMIGRANT VISAS

 

A Nonimmigrant Visa is a temporary immigration classification for a specific period of time. It is issued by a U.S. consulate or embassy, and permits a foreign national to enter the United States for a set, temporary period of time to take part in a specific activity. Examples of nonimmigrant visas include: B-1/B-2 Visitor Visas, H-1B “Specialty Occupation” Visas, L-1A
Multinational Executive/Manager Visas, TN “Professional” Visas for citizens of Canada and Mexico, E-3 visas for citizens of Australia, and F-1 Student Visas. 


Certain nonimmigrant visas, such as employment-based visas, require a U.S.-based employer tofirst file a nonimmigrant petition (Form I-129) with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Once a petition is approved, the foreign national beneficiary can apply for the nonimmigrant visa at a U.S. consulate or embassy, or a change status if he or she is already residing in the U.S. in a valid immigration status.

Frequently asked questions

Individuals and Family

B-1: Temporary Business Visitor Visa


For foreign workers participating in commercial or professional business activities in the US (i.e. consulting, conference attendance, negotiating a contract, or short-term training). Maximum stay: 6 months, with 6-month renewal. Cannot earn an income on this visa. No cap. No deadline. Learn more




B-2: Temporary Pleasure, Tourism or Medical Treatment Visitor Visa


Available to visitors interested in recreational or personal travel. Reasons for a personal visit may include tourism, visiting family and friends, medical treatment, social or service activities, and amateur participants in sporting or entertainment events. Visitors may stay in the US for 6 months, with an opportunity to extend their visit for another 6 months (1 year total). Learn more




F-1: Student Visa


​- Optional Practical Training (OPT) is temporary employment that is directly related to an F-1 student’s major area of study. Eligible students can apply to receive up to 12 months of OPT employment authorization before completing their academic studies (pre-completion) and/or after completing their academic studies (post-completion). However, all periods of pre-completion OPT will be deducted from the available period of post-completion OPT. Curricular Practical Training (CPT): Students are not required to immediately return home upon completion of their program on an F1 visa. Instead, F-1 visa holders can remain in the US for up to 60 days after completing their academic program or OPT training. Any students wishing to remain in the States after their program must change their visa status, re-enroll in a higher program, or have the option to transfer to a new school and receive new visa documents.




Green Card Based on Marriage


I-485 - Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status

  • Once a foreign spouse has received an approved I-130 (or if the spouse is already in the US), the foreign national can apply to Adjust Status to that of a Legal Permanent Resident (Green Card application).
  • For purposes of a marriage-based Green Card, only a foreign spouse who is physically present in the United States can file an I-485 to apply for a Green Card. The processing time for I-485 applications filed by spouses of U.S. citizens is currently about 9-12 months.
  • The foreign national will also apply for work authorization (EAD card) and Advance Parole to have permission to leave the United States while the Adjustment of Status application is pending without abandoning the application.
I-130 - Petition for Alien Relative
  • Use this form if you are a citizen or lawful permanent resident (LPR) of the United States who wants to petition for your spouse to immigrate to the United States with a Green Card.
  • For married couples that are both present in the United States, you will file the I-130 at the same time as the I-485 to Adjust Status to that of a Legal Permanent Resident (Green Card application). Spouses who reside outside the United States may apply for a visa with the U.S. consulate in their home country through the I-130.
Form I-485 - Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status
  • Typically, relatives who reside outside the United States may apply for a visa with the U.S. Department of State. For more information, please see the form instructions.




German Citizenship Retention


Under the German Nationality Act “Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetz”, the moment a German citizen acquires citizenship of another country, he or she loses German citizenship automatically because German law does not allow dual citizenship in this context. This means that if a US resident wishes to obtain US citizenship while retaining his or her German citizenship, the applicant must first petition the German government to allow the applicant to maintain his or her German citizenship. This requirement is unique to German citizens and provides an additional, preliminary step before the applicant may apply for US citizenship. Learn more




Citizenship/Naturalization


If you meet certain requirements, you may become a U.S. citizen either at birth or after birth. To become a citizen at birth, you must:

  • Have been born in the United States or certain territories or outlying possessions of the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction of the United States; OR
  • Had a parent or parents who were citizens at the time of your birth (if you were born abroad) and meet other requirements

To become a citizen after birth, you must:

  • Apply for “derived” or “acquired” citizenship through parents

  • Apply for naturalization

    • You May Qualify for Naturalization if:

      • You have been a permanent resident for at least 5 years and meet all other eligibility requirements, please visit our Path to Citizenship page for more information.

      • You have been a permanent resident for 3 years or more and meet all eligibility requirements to file as a spouse of a U.S. citizen, please visit our Naturalization for Spouses of U.S. Citizens page for more information.

      • You have qualifying service in the U.S. armed forces and meet all other eligibility requirements. Visit the Military section of our website.

      • Your child may qualify for naturalization if you are a U.S. citizen, the child was born outside the U.S., the child is currently residing outside the U.S., and all other eligibility requirements are met.




K-1: Fiance Visa


A K-1 visa is issued to the fiancé or fiancée of a United States citizen to enter the United States with the intent to marry. The K-1 visa requires that the foreigner marry his or her U.S. citizen petitioner within 90 days of entry, or else he or she must depart the United States. After marriage, the US citizen spouse can petition to Adjust Status to that of a Permanent Resident (apply for a Green Card)





 

INVESTOR OR ENTREPRENEUR

We assist entrepreneurs as they visit the US to research the market, assists with corporate setup, and prepares visa applications for business owners of new or existing businesses.

Green Cards


are valid for a period of 10 years. Once a Beneficiary has been a Permanent Resident for 5 years, he or she can apply for Naturalization to become a U.S. Citizen. If the Green Card was obtained based on marriage to a U.S. Citizen or Permanent Resident, the Beneficiary need only wait 3 years before applying for Naturalization.




EB-2: Professionals with Advanced Degrees or Persons with Exceptional Ability


The EB-2 employment-based permanent resident classification is reserved for individuals who fall into one of three categories:

  1. Advanced Degree,
  2. Exceptional Ability,
  3. and National Interest Waiver.
Advanced Degree For the Advanced Degree category, the foreign national must possess a Master’s or higher degree (or its equivalent) in a specific profession and be employed in a position that would require such a degree. Generally, holders of employment-based (H-1B, O-1) or student visa (F-1) classifications will apply for this classification. Exceptional Ability The Exceptional Ability Category requires the foreign national to demonstrate that he or she has gained national or international recognition for past work in the arts, science, or business. The Applicant must also demonstrate that he or she will be employed in a position that requires his or her specific exceptional ability. Often, O-1 outstanding ability nonimmigrant classification holders will apply for this category, given the similarities of the two classifications. National Interest Waiver The National Interest Waiver category is substantially similar to the Exceptional Ability category described above. The one difference is that the foreign national, can request a waiver of the U.S. employer requirement by demonstrating that he or she will bring skills or talent that is highly beneficial to the U.S. Often, O-1 outstanding ability nonimmigrant classification holders will apply for this category based on the similarities of the two classifications, and because an employer is not required.




EB-3: Bachelor's Degree, Skilled, Unskilled Workers


  • While the EB-3 classification covers a variety of professional and unskilled categories, the primary category is the “professionals” category. This is reserved for individuals who possess at least a Bachelor’s Degree (or its equivalent) in a specific profession, and will be working in a position that requires such a degree.
  • While any nonimmigrant classification can be adjusted to this classification, the vast majority of nonimmigrant classification holders who apply for the EB-3 classification hold H-1B Specialty Occupation classifications. This is primarily due to the fact that both the H-1B and the EB-3 classifications have similar underlying requirements.
  • Applicants without a Bachelor’s Degree, such as those on the H-2B for Temporary Non-Agricultural Workers, may apply for the EB-3 unskilled category.




EB-1: Extraordinary Ability, Outstanding Researchers/Professors, International Managers/Executive


is an employment-based Permanent Resident classification is reserved for individuals who fall into one of three categories:

  1. Extraordinary Ability
  2. Outstanding Professor or Researcher
  3. Multinational Manager or Executive.
The corresponding nonimmigrant classification that can lead to EB-1 Permanent Residence depends on the specific EB-1 category sought by the Applicant. However, none of these categories requires a nonimmigrant classification as a prerequisite because they can all be obtained by a qualifying foreign national outside the U.S. via consular processing. Extraordinary Ability: This is a self-petitioning category that does not require a prior nonimmigrant visa, but the most typical visas issued as a precursor to the EB-1 are the O-1A and O-1B visas for individuals with extraordinary ability. However, some nonimmigrant classifications do not permit Adjustment of Status in the US, including the Visa Waiver Program, K-1 fiancée classification, and J-1 visas that have a 2-year home country requirement. Outstanding Professor or Researcher: This is a category created specifically for leading academics. While most nonimmigrant classifications can be adjusted to this immigrant category, the most common types are academic or employment-based classifications, such as an F-1 student, H-1B “Specialty Occupation,” or O-1 Outstanding Ability visa. Multinational Executive or Manager: While most nonimmigrant classifications could be adjusted to this category, this is the one category under the EB-1 classification that has a specific corresponding non-immigrant classification--the L-1A Multinational Executive/Manager classification. In order to qualify for the EB-1-3, the applicant must demonstrate executive or managerial employment abroad with a qualifying entity for at least one year in the past three years.





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